Ask me anything

Submit

Southern Gal (Charlotte, NC) | Historian | Archivist |PhD Student | HBCU Enthusiast | (HowardU & VSU alumna)

I do not own the rights to most of the photographs posted, please message me should they need to be taken down.

Some examples of Charlotte’s early architecture have survived despite the rapid “redeveloping” (code: gentrified) areas of the city. This grand 2 story was named for the 1st Black professor at Biddle University (Now Johnson C. smith Univeristy). The house is located at 301 Campus Street, across from the university, and is a locally designated historic landmark. (Courtesy of Second Ward High School National Alumni Foundation) #queencityhistory #hbcu #blackhighschools

Some examples of Charlotte’s early architecture have survived despite the rapid “redeveloping” (code: gentrified) areas of the city. This grand 2 story was named for the 1st Black professor at Biddle University (Now Johnson C. smith Univeristy). The house is located at 301 Campus Street, across from the university, and is a locally designated historic landmark. (Courtesy of Second Ward High School National Alumni Foundation) #queencityhistory #hbcu #blackhighschools

2 hours ago
0 notes
Questlove Makes a Case For Iggy Azalea, Calls "Fancy" the Song of the Summer

theblackamericanprincess:

himteckerjam:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

afro-dominicano:

dynastylnoire:

darkmoonperfume:

Weigh in on what Questlove said

NO

Not Questlove :/

the fact that you call it “the song of the summer” says something ….. it’s pop.

not hip hop.

?uestlove went New Black on us

My heart.

FUCK.

NOOOOOO et tu Questlove?!?!?!?!

1 day ago
399 notes
The happiness of your life depends on the quality of your thoughts.
This portrait of the Diamond family was adapted for use as an advertisement that encouraged families to buy insurance. Little Vermelle (who I spoke with last weekend and today 1948 Miss Queen City Classic 1949 Second Ward graduate) looks at a magazine with her mother, Cora; baby Kenneth Diamond Jr. plays at the feet of his father, Kenneth Diamond Sr.  (Courtesy of Mrs. Vermelle Diamond Ely) #secondward #Blackhighschools #charlotte #1969

This portrait of the Diamond family was adapted for use as an advertisement that encouraged families to buy insurance. Little Vermelle (who I spoke with last weekend and today 1948 Miss Queen City Classic 1949 Second Ward graduate) looks at a magazine with her mother, Cora; baby Kenneth Diamond Jr. plays at the feet of his father, Kenneth Diamond Sr. (Courtesy of Mrs. Vermelle Diamond Ely) #secondward #Blackhighschools #charlotte #1969

3 hours ago
0 notes
Brown Girl Herstory: Pioneering librarian Dr. Annette Lewis Phinazee was born on this date in 1920.Born in Orangeburg, SC, young Annette attended the public schools of Orangeburg and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in modern foreign languages from Fisk University in 1939. She received the bachelor of library science degree in 1941 and the master of library science degree in 1948 from the University of Illinois. In 1961 she was the first woman and the first black American woman to earn the doctorate in library science from Columbia University.Dr. Phinazee started her teaching career in North Carolina at the Caswell County Training School from 1939 to 1940 as a teacher-librarian. She was a cataloguer in the library at Talladega College in Alabama from 1941 to 1942. From 1942 until 1944 she held the position of journalism librarian at Lincoln University, Missouri. She taught cataloging and classification courses at the Atlanta University School of Library Service (1946–57) and became renowned as teacher and counselor to generations of black American librarians. Dr. Phinazee served for a period of time as a cataloguer at Southern Illinois University (1957–62). She returned to Atlanta University as head of special services, which included the administration of the Trevor Arnett Library’s Negro Collection - a world-renowned depository of American Africana (1962–67) - and returned to a professorship at the School of Library Service (1963–69). In 1969 Phinazee took the assistant directorship of the Cooperative College Library Center in Atlanta. This was a library-centered service adjunct of the United Board for College Development whose mission was to develop college libraries in the historically black college and university sector of American academia.Dr. Phinazee passed away in September 1983.

Courtesy of The Association of Black Women Historians Facebook Page via Brown Girl Collective Facebook Page.

Brown Girl Herstory: Pioneering librarian Dr. Annette Lewis Phinazee was born on this date in 1920.

Born in Orangeburg, SC, young Annette attended the public schools of Orangeburg and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in modern foreign languages from Fisk University in 1939. She received the bachelor of library science degree in 1941 and the master of library science degree in 1948 from the University of Illinois. In 1961 she was the first woman and the first black American woman to earn the doctorate in library science from Columbia University.

Dr. Phinazee started her teaching career in North Carolina at the Caswell County Training School from 1939 to 1940 as a teacher-librarian. She was a cataloguer in the library at Talladega College in Alabama from 1941 to 1942. From 1942 until 1944 she held the position of journalism librarian at Lincoln University, Missouri. She taught cataloging and classification courses at the Atlanta University School of Library Service (1946–57) and became renowned as teacher and counselor to generations of black American librarians. Dr. Phinazee served for a period of time as a cataloguer at Southern Illinois University (1957–62). 

She returned to Atlanta University as head of special services, which included the administration of the Trevor Arnett Library’s Negro Collection - a world-renowned depository of American Africana (1962–67) - and returned to a professorship at the School of Library Service (1963–69). In 1969 Phinazee took the assistant directorship of the Cooperative College Library Center in Atlanta. This was a library-centered service adjunct of the United Board for College Development whose mission was to develop college libraries in the historically black college and university sector of American academia.

Dr. Phinazee passed away in September 1983.

Courtesy of The Association of Black Women Historians Facebook Page via Brown Girl Collective Facebook Page.

1 day ago
1 note